Hurricane Dorian slammed into Elbow Cay in the Abaco Islands at 12:40 p.m (local time) and then made a second landfall near Marsh Harbour on Great Abaco Island at 2pm, after authorities made last-minute pleas for those in low-lying areas to evacuate.

By Ian Horswill


Posted on September 2, 2019

Hurricane Dorian struck the northern Bahamas as a catastrophic Category 5 storm Sunday (local time), its record 185mph winds ripping off roofs, overturning cars and tearing down power lines as hundreds hunkered down in schools, churches and shelters, AP News reported.

Dorian slammed into Elbow Cay in the Abaco Islands at 12:40 pm (local time) and then made a second landfall near Marsh Harbour on Great Abaco Island at 2pm, after authorities made last-minute pleas for those in low-lying areas to evacuate.

“It’s devastating,” said Joy Jibrilu, director general of the Bahamas’ Ministry of Tourism and Aviation. “There has been huge damage to property and infrastructure. Luckily, no loss of life reported.”

The US National Hurricane Centre (NHC) said even a glancing blow from one of the strongest storms ever to menace Florida could bring torrential rains and damaging winds.

“On this track, the core of extremely dangerous Hurricane Dorian will continue to pound Great Abaco this evening and move near or over Grand Bahama Island tonight and Monday,” the NHC said in a 5pm (2100 GMT) advisory. “The hurricane will move dangerously close to the Florida east coast late Monday through Tuesday night.”

Dorian is forecast to remain a hurricane for the next five days, the NHC said. With its maximum sustained winds of 185mph (295kph) and gusts up to 220 mph, Dorian tied the record for the most powerful Atlantic hurricane ever to come ashore, equaling the Labor Day hurricane of 1935, before the storms were named.

Hubert Minnis, Bahamian PM wept at a press conference: “This is probably the saddest and worst day of my life to address the Bahamian people …. We are facing a hurricane, Hurricane Dorian that we have never seen in the Bahamas.”

Henry McMaster, the governor of South Carolina, has ordered a mandatory evacuation of his state’s entire coast.

State troopers will begin reversing lanes at 12 noon (Monday local time) to allow people to head inland on major coastal highways.