Jack Dorsey's position for Twitter sets it apart from the stance taken by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. In a speech at Georgetown University earlier this month, Zuckerberg said that Facebook considered banning political ads but believed that the company did not have the right to decide what speech is acceptable or not.

By Ian Horswill


Posted on October 31, 2019

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey has said the social media network will ban all political advertising worldwide.

Jack Dorsey made the announcement in a series of tweets that Twitter will stop running political ads, effective from 22 November.

The final policy will be shared on 15 November, Dorsey tweeted, which will explain the new policy in full and the exceptions to the rule.

For example, advertisements that promote voter registration will still be allowed on the platform, Dorsey said.

Earlier this month, Joe Biden’s 2020 presidential campaign penned letters to Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube asking that they refuse to run false or misleading political ads. Biden’s campaign had become the target of a series of ads placed by President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign that made claims regarding the Biden family’s relationship with the Ukrainian government, The Verge reported.

Dorsey said there were a number of issues that make political advertising a dicey proposition, including algorithmic targeting, misinformation and disturbing fake news.

“We considered stopping only candidate ads, but issue ads present a way to circumvent,” Dorsey tweeted. “Additionally, it isn’t fair for everyone but candidates to buy ads for issues they want to push. So we’re stopping these too.”

Dorsey’s position for Twitter sets it apart from the stance taken by Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. In a speech at Georgetown University earlier this month, Zuckerberg said that Facebook considered banning political ads but believed that the company did not have the right to decide what speech is acceptable or not.

Dorsey seems to take a shot at Zuckerberg’s controversial statements, Vice reported, saying, “It‘s not credible for us to say: ‘We’re working hard to stop people from gaming our systems to spread misleading info, but if someone pays us to target and force people to see their political ad … well…they can say whatever they want!’”