"It’s an honor (sic) to be tied with Sam Snead for most wins in PGA Tour history. Thanks Mom and Pop and everyone who helped make this possible," said Tiger Woods after winning his 82nd PGA title.

By Ian Horswill


Posted on October 28, 2019

Tiger Woods turned the inaugural Zozo Championship in Japan into something historical.

Tiger Woods, now 43, won the first PGA Tour event ever held in Japan and the 15-time major title winner equalled US legend Sam Snead’s all-time record of 82 US PGA Tour victories set 54 years ago.

All this in Tiger Woods’ first tournament since arthroscopic surgery on his left knee for the fifth time two months ago. Don’t forget Tiger Woods had two years out of the game with back problems.

“It’s an honor to be tied with Sam Snead for most wins in PGA Tour history. Thanks Mom and Pop and everyone who helped make this possible. Hideki put up an amazing fight on his home soil, but to do this in Japan is something I’ll never forget. It’s been an awesome year,” Tiger Woods said on his Facebook page.

Tiger Woods won the Zozo Championship at Narashino Country Club in Chiba, 40 kilometres southeast of the centre of Tokyo, by three strokes from Japanese player Hideki Matsuyama to equal Snead’s amazing record. It was also his 32nd win by three strokes or more.

“It’s crazy. It’s a lot,” Tiger Woods said.

A lot will not be enough for Tiger Woods if he can maintain his fitness.

“Certainly, the future looks brighter than it has,” he said, Golf Digest reported. “I hope I can be as good as consistent as (Snead) was, well into my 40s and 50s.”

Tiger Woods won his 78th PGA event when he was 37 years old and competing in just his 286th tour event as a professional – a jaw-dropping 27% success rate.

Win No. 82 comes in his 359th start. His winning percentage has dipped to 22.8, yet it’s still the highest in golf history. Ben Hogan is the only other player better than 20% (21.3). Impressive on its own merit. But turn the stat on its head. Eighty-two wins in 359 events amounts to a victory every 4.37 starts. It’s a staggering figure. Most good players are happy to win once a season, about every 20 starts.

“You look at the guys that have won 10 times and it’s pretty special, let alone to come out here and win 82 times,” said US Open champion Gary Woodland, who was paired with Woods over the final 36 holes in Japan.