To give the world an opportunity to see the total solar eclipse, NASA has partnered with the Exploratorium in San Francisco to livestream the event.

By Ian Horswill


Posted on July 2, 2019

NASA will livestream the total solar eclipse that will only be seen in parts of South America.

To give the world an opportunity to see the total eclipse, which last occurred in August 2017, NASA has partnered with the Exploratorium in San Francisco to livestream the event.

The moon’s umbral shadow will be visible only from Chile, Argentina and an uninhabited South Pacific island – unless you’re on a cruise ship. However, a partial eclipse may be seen in other parts of South America, including Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador.

The total eclipse is expected to last up to four minutes, depending on the location, NASA believes. NASA will livestream three Exploratorium views via separate players on the agency’s website.

NASA will provide live views from telescopes in Vicuña, Chile, presented without audio, on Tuesday from 3–6pm. A one-hour program with live commentary in English will be from 4–5pm and a one-hour program with live commentary in Spanish from 4–5pm.

In London,UK, it is at 21:38 BST on 2 July and Paris, France at 22:38 CEST. In the US the toal solar eclipse will be at, in New York at 16:38 EDT, Chicago at 15:38 CDT, Denver at 14:38 MDT and Los Angeles 13:38 PDT.

The time for the partial solar eclipse in Sydney, Australia, is 2.55am Wednesday, 3 July and the total solar eclipse at 4.01am and the maximum at 5.22am.

The weather forecast is for good for the total and partial solar eclipses.

NASA Television will also carry the English-language program on its public channel. Both programs will feature updates from NASA’s Parker Solar Probe and Magnetospheric Multiscale missions.

“Studying the Sun during total solar eclipses helps scientists understand the source and behaviour of solar radiation that drives space weather near Earth, which can affect the health of astronauts in space and the durability of materials used to build spacecraft,” NASA said. Similar data will be important in planning NASA’s return of astronauts to the Moon in 2024 and eventual crewed missions to Mars.

Millions of people in the US were able to witness the last total solar eclipse on August 21, 2017. Everyone in North America was able to view at least a partial eclipse, with totality crossing 14 states.

A partial eclipse was also viewable from parts of South America, Europe and West Africa. Before the 2017 event, a solar eclipse had not been visible across the entire US since 1918.