StandardToilet designer Mahabir Gill said the angle of the toilet seat provides health and wellbeing benefits through improved posture and encouraging less time sitting on the toilet.

By Ian Horswill


Posted on December 18, 2019

A startup company has designed a toilet which it claims will end employers’ extended bathroom breaks.

The designer of the StandardToilet says users would not be able to sit on the seat for five minutes as the toilet seat is sloped forward by about 13 degrees to increase strain on the legs similar to a gentle squat thrust, Wired reported.

StandardToilet, which is a new business in Staffordshire, UK, said it has had interest from local councils and motorway cafes and restaurants for its product.

toilet, sloping toilet

“It is estimated that in the United Kingdom alone, extended employee breaks costs industry and commerce an £4 billion per annum,” said StandardToilet designer Mahabir Gill.

“With the advent of flexible zero hour contracts it is easy to see why our StandardToilet can be an asset to a business.”

Gill said the angle of the toilet seat provides health and wellbeing benefits through improved posture and encouraging less time sitting on the toilet.

“Medical studies have suggested that using the traditional WC can cause swollen haemorrhoids and weakening of pelvic muscles,” he said.

“The StandardToilet provides increased comfort through promoting the engagement of upper and lower leg muscles which helps reduce musculoskeletan disorders.”

Gill added that the toilet has been sloped at 13 degrees as it is inconvenient for the employee but not harmful, in fact it could have some health benefits around improving posture.

“Anything higher would cause wider problems. Thirteen degrees is not too inconvenient, but you’d soon want to get off the seat,” he said.

Health and safety software provider protecting.co.uk carried out a survey across eight UK cities in July that found some people were spending up to 28 minutes in the bathroom while at work.

The researchers found that with the average bathroom break in a London office sitting at 28 minutes and 35 seconds, companies might be losing up to two and a half hours of working time per week for each employee.

Protecting stated that at an average hourly wage in London of £12.78 this was costing companies £1,533.60 per year per employee.

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