Ivanka Trump said one of the White House’s major priorities is to work with private industry to build the country’s workforce, admitting "most of the federal government training programs don't work."

By Ian Horswill


Posted on January 8, 2020

The Venetian’s Palazzo Ballroom in Las Vegas was packed with over 1000 packing the room well before US President Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka Trump walked on stage to give the keynote session at CES 2020, one of the world’s largest consumer electronics event in the world, in Las Vegas.

Ivanka Trump, who is the workforce development adviser to the US President and co-chairs the National Council for the American Worker with Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, and the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board that’s made up of tech leaders including the CEOs of Apple, Lockheed Martin and IBM, spoke on ‘The Path to the Future of Work’.

Ivanka Trump advocated programs that would help blue-collar workers keep pace with a rapidly evolving economy and addressed strategies to re-skill workers, develop apprenticeships and invest in science and technology education programs, Washington Post reported.

“It’s not only about training for the jobs of the future,” she said. “People need to be thinking about investing in their current workforce so they can enable those people to do their same job using different equipment tomorrow.

“I’m a big believer in innovation and the positive impact productivity has on economy, and fighting for American dominance in the industry.”

Ivanka Trump said one of the White House’s major priorities is to work with private industry to build the country’s workforce, admitting “most of the federal government training programs don’t work.”

“If we can’t come together on this, we can’t come together on anything,” she said.

Her appearance was deemed controversial but Ivanka Trump correctly stated that there was record low unemployment in the US across all demographics. Of people who have secured jobs in the past year, 73% came from groups that were marginalised or came from outside the workforce, she claimed.

Ivanka Trump, CES 2000

She noted that there’s a concern among US employers about a lack of skilled workers. There are 500,000 unfilled jobs in the US manufacturing sector and over 7 million unfilled jobs in total across the country because companies can’t find workers with the right skills.

“It’s forced employers to get creative,” she said, citing examples of companies hiring formerly incarcerated people. Trump said the fastest wage growth among US workers is happening in the bottom quartile of earners.

“There really is a blue-collar boom in this country,” she said.

Ivanka Trump talked about White House jobs initiatives, including the Pledge to America’s Workers, which she said has created 14 million new training and reskilling opportunities, to galvanize private-sector interest in investing in jobs, which includes a promise from 42 Consumer Tech Association members, who have identified 392,214 new US worker training opportunities over the next five years.

The Trump government also is working with the Ad Council on an campaign highlighting multiple pathways to high-skilled labor, she said.

Companies need to “think about hiring in a new way,” said Trump. “The most important social impact you should be opining on is about your own family — your own workforce.”

“I believe innovation is a net job-producer,’ Ivanka trump said. “Innovation will allow for more inclusive growth,” she added, citing as an example that disabled people are able to use robotics to perform job functions they previously couldn’t.