Musk said the sledgehammer that bounced off the door had caused an unseen crack in the base of the glass, which had subsequently led to the windows smashing when they were hit with a steel ball.

By Ian Horswill


Posted on November 26, 2019

Tesla co-founder and CEO Elon Musk has explained why the armoured unbreakable windows of the electric vehicle company’s Cybertruck smashed during an embarrassing unveiling of their pickup truck.

Musk, also founder, CEO, and chief engineer of SpaceX, replied to a fan on Tesla’s Twitter feed on why the window smashed during the launch in Los Angeles.

Musk said that the smash happened because the Cybertruck was first struck with a sledgehammer in what seemed to be a successful demonstration of the Cybertruck’s body strength.

But the sledgehammer had caused an unseen crack, Musk said, which had subsequently led to the windows smashing when they were hit with a steel ball.

“Sledgehammer impact on door cracked the base of the glass, which is why the steel ball didn’t bounce off,” Musk wrote.

“Should have done steel ball on window, then sledgehammer the door. Next time.”

Musk has tweeted footage of an earlier demonstration, carried out behind the scenes moments before the launch, showing the windows withstanding the impact of the steel ball.

Musk claims that the Cybertruck is better than a Ford F-150 and faster than a Porsche 911 and is happy to show its power.

The vehicle, based on the 1982 movie Bladerunner, drew a mixed response from the motoring world due to its stainless steel bodywork and angular design. Whether it will be the final product is another question as production is not scheduled to start before late 2021. The Cybertruck comes with a single, dual or three-motors, with a price tag of US$49,900.

“The edgy design is decidedly unconventional for a pickup and promises to be polarising. But the price and performance specifications seem likely to appeal to any would-be truck shopper,” said Consumer Reports.

“Yeah, it looks outrageous, with a design that’s more at home on the surface of Mars than in a Walmart parking lot. But if you’re willing to accept that, the truck could be more than meets the eye when it goes into production in late 2021,” wrote The Verge.

“As millions of fans around the world tuned in to watch the California unveiling live online, many were expecting the triangular-shaped show car to be a facade. Perhaps the real pick-up was underneath it, or behind a curtain. Even as the Tesla Cybertruck rolled onto the stage, fans were initially not sure whether to applaud or laugh,” wrote Car Advice Australia.

Cybertruck Tesla

“It’s hard to say if that one infamous moment is why Tesla has been able to get 200,000 deposits on the Cybertruck but all the extra attention certainly didn’t hurt,” said Jessica Caldwell, from vehicle marketplace Edmunds. “Moments like that are why Tesla has such a passionate fan base: while most executives are always hyper-rehearsed and polished, Elon Musk has never been afraid to show his human side, for better or worse.

“Tesla’s fans are notorious for giving the company the benefit of the doubt and assume the technology will be sorted out by the time the truck actually goes on sale.”