The Australian Transport Safety Bureau noted it was "almost inconceivable and certainly societally unacceptable" for a large commercial aircraft to be lost without a trace.

By Joe McDonough


Posted on October 4, 2017

After the biggest search of its kind in aviation history, the mystery of flight MH370 remains.

The final report on the Malaysian Airlines flight that disappeared on its journey from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in 2014, has just been released by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB). And despite “more than 120,000 square kilometres of seafloor”, and millions of square kilometres of ocean surface being scoured over 1000 days, neither the aircraft nor the reason for the disappearance have been obtained.

The report indicates its resting place was narrowed down to a 25,000 square kilometre region of the southern Indian Ocean when the search was terminated in January, 2017. That’s, of course, cold comfort to the families and friends of the 239 people who went missing on March 8, 2014, never to be heard from again.

The ATSB noted it was “almost inconceivable and certainly societally unacceptable” for a large commercial aircraft to be lost without a trace, adding “We … deeply regret that we have not been able to locate the aircraft, nor those 239 souls on board that remain missing.”

We … deeply regret that we have not been able to locate the aircraft, nor those 239 souls on board that remain missing.

It is taking steps to ensure it will never happen again, by advancing other aircraft systems including emergency locator transponders and flight recorder locator beacons. The report also indicates that Malaysian government will continue to work on its investigation of the facts and circumstances surrounding the loss of MH370.